Meditation and Pain

The NIH has put out in their Mind and Body Information page a video that looks at Meditation and Pain. Share with someone you know that might benefit.

Mindfulness meditation can help a person with pain focus on the pain sensation—and this causes changes in both the subjective response to pain and the brain’s reaction to it, said Dr. Richard Davidson, founder of the Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, in an NCCIH video interview. Focusing on specific pain sensations—such as tingling, pressure, or heat—seems to diminish the emotional aspects of pain, and that helps people cope with the pain they’re experiencing.

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Resource of the day: National Center for Complimentary and Integrative Health

What Are Mind and Body Practices?

 

The term “mind and body” can be confusing. People sometimes think it refers only to meditation and yoga. But mind and body practices are much more diverse than that.

At the National Center for Complimentary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), the term mind and body practices refers to a large group of procedures or techniques administered or taught by a trained practitioner or teacher. They include spinal manipulation, massage therapy, relaxation techniques, tai chi, qi gong, yoga, and various types of mindfulness- and meditation-based practices, among others.

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Researchers have done many studies on some mind and body practices, such as acupuncture, spinal manipulation, mediation, and yoga. Less research has been done on some other practices.

 

To find out more about mind and body practices that interest you, visit the NCCIH Mind and Body Web page.  Click Here

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4 Tips: Mind and Body Practices for Common Aging-Related Conditions

Many older adults are turning to complementary and integrative health approaches to promote health and well-being. Mind and body practices, in particular, including relaxation techniques and meditative exercise forms such as yoga, tai chi, and qi gong are being used by older Americans, both for fitness and relaxation, and because of perceived health benefits. A number of reviews of the scientific literature point to the potential benefit of mind and body approaches for symptom management, particularly for pain. Check out what the science says about mind and body practices for these 4 common aging-related conditions:

 
 

1.       Osteoarthritis. Practicing tai chi—a traditional Chinese form of exercise—may be helpful for managing osteoarthritis of the knee. Guidelines issued by the American College of Rheumatology conditionally recommend tai chi, along with other non-drug approaches, for this condition.
  

2.       Menopausal symptoms. Overall, there is scientific evidence suggesting that some mind and body approaches, such as yoga, tai chi, and meditation may provide some relief from common menopausal symptoms.
  

3.       Sleep problems. Using relaxation techniques, (e.g., progressive relaxation, guided imagery, biofeedback, self-hypnosis, and deep breathing exercises) before bedtime can be helpful components of a successful sleep regimen.
  

4.       Shingles. Tai chi may help older adults avoid getting shingles by increasing immunity to varicella-zoster virus and boosting the immune response to varicella vaccine in older people. While there have only been a few studies on the effects of tai chi on immunity to varicella, the results so far have been promising.
  

These mind and body practices are generally considered safe for healthy people when they’re performed appropriately. If you have any health problems, talk with both your health care provider and the complementary health practitioner/instructor before starting to use a mind and body practice. For information about natural products for common aging-related conditions, check out these tips.

 

LInk to Website Article: https://nccih.nih.gov/health/tips/age-mindbody?nav=govd